ShorteesStyle

fashion, lifestyle, dating and humor for the average guy

Archive for the month “January, 2015”

Target shows love for plus size women.

Ava & Viv by Target

Ava & Viv by Target

The average women wears a size 14.  More then half of the population is overweight.  That is a lot of potential plus sized customers.  Despite this fact, almost the entire fashion industry ignores this reality, and the $17.5  billion in annual sales plus-size women produce.  Starting mid-February Target, yes that Target, is going tackle the problem head on.  They will be launching a new 90 piece collection designed in-house specifically for today’s full figured women.

The new line, named Ava & Viv will feature basics and statement pieces in sizes 14-26.  Hats off to Target.  How this market has been so under-served for so long I have no idea.  It is one of those problems and solutions that is so obvious, so in your face that its shocking so few people try to tackle it.  It reminds me of another under-served but giant market, short men. Oh wait, someone is taking on that problem, me (www.originalshortees.com).

I’ve gone shopping with women who wear sizes that have two digits in them.  It’s a frustration process.  The options are incredibly limited, the styles and generally atrocious and unflattering and they are often designed with little thought to how plus size customers are really shaped.

Target isn’t just solving a clothing problem for today’s women.  Besides the revenue potential this line can generate, they know that today’s plus size women is also a girlfriend, wife, mother, homeowner.  If they can give them a genuine reason to come into the store their cart is not going to hit the checkout line with just a pair of pants.  Toilet paper, soap, cleaning supplies, books, beauty products, groceries.  Customers coming in to look for new clothes are going to buy more of everything Target has to offer.  And that is some pretty smart business.

Read more about it at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/barbarathau/2015/01/27/why-targets-new-plus-sized-line-could-redefine-17-5-billion-underserved-market/

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The Gap drops Piperlime

piperlime logoGap logo

In 1969 Don Fisher started The Gap for a simple reason.  He could not find jeans that fit (sounds familiar).  Today The Gap consists of 6 brands, almost 3,700 stores, 150,000 employees and more than $16 billion in revenue.  Soon enough The Gap will be back down to 5 brands.

Gap announced that is will be dropping its Piperlime brand and focusing on continuing to grow its Athleta brand, a direct competitor to industry leader Lululemon, along with reinvigorating its namesake The Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy brands.  Piperlime, with only $100 million in revenues represents a tiny drop in the bucket for The Gap.  Hard to believe that a $100 brand can be considered a throw away, drop in the bucket.

This isn’t the first time The Gap has closed or sold off another brand.  Anyone remember Hemisphere or Forth & Towne?  Or that The Gap used to own Pottery Barn?

What color shoes go with what color pants?

It’s a well-known fact that something in the Y chromosome makes it more difficult for men to properly match colors.  Yes you have mastered wearing black dress shoes with your only suit but with today’s growing selection of different colored pants not only are you looking more like your wife/girlfriend, you have to actually think about what color shoes to wear.

Thanks to Justin Jeffers, The Fine Young Gentleman you no longer have to think.  Just look at this handy spreadsheet published in Business Insider and walk out of the house with confidence that you won’t embarrass yourself.

Shoe Pant Guide, The Fine Young Gentleman

Shoe Pant Guide, The Fine Young Gentleman

Find the original at: http://www.businessinsider.com/what-color-shoes-to-wear-with-pants-2013-11

What Label is that? Will Men Buy The Same Brands Their Girlfriend Wears?

Looks from Michael Kors Autumn/Winter '14 Mens Collection | Source: Michael Kors

Looks from Michael Kors Autumn/Winter ’14 Mens Collection | Source: Michael Kors

The menswear market is growing.  Faster then women’s.  Will today’s average guy be willing to slap his girlfriends label on his shirt?  We’re betting the average guy doesn’t know who Michael Kors or Tory Burch is.  And those that do are willing to put on whatever their wife or girlfriend buys them, just so long as they don’t have to go to the mall to try it on.  The upscale men’s fashion market in the US is small.  For all the blogs and TV coverage about fashion, most men don’t care.  They want basics that make them look like they belong.  Most men don’t want anything that is going to stand out to much and the smaller percentage that do, don’t want to be to loud and overstated.  Just look good and have a dash of something that will garner a compliment.  Sure there will always be a small fashion forward market and yes, it will generate billions for the luxury houses and brands that capture it but it will still make up a small percentage of the menswear sold.  And for today’s shorter man, forget it.  The odds of any of the major fashion brands catering to us is slim to none.  Perhaps if you are extra lean and closer to the 5’7″-5’8″ mark you can squeeze into a small, otherwise you’re out of luck.

NEW YORK, United States — When Michael Kors’ 22,000-square-foot flagship opens at 520 Broadway in Soho this December, there will be a floor dedicated to accessories and fragrances, another to women’s fashion and shoes and another, entirely stocked with menswear, kicking off the multi-billion-dollar brand’s foray into the men’s market. “From there, we will begin to test free-standing men’s stores next year and believe that there may be the potential for as many as 500 men’s stores worldwide over the long term,” said Michael Kors chairman and CEO John Idol on an earnings call in August. The company projects its men’s business will generate $1 billion in revenue by 2017.

By Lauren Sherman, Dec 15, 2014 at Business of Fashion.

Read the rest at: http://www.businessoffashion.com/2014/12/womenswear-brands-make-play-mens-market.html

Men’s bottoms never looked so warm and snugly. If only your pants were made from Afghan blankets.

 

Lord von Schmitt

Lord von Schmitt

It’s hard to find words to describe this discovery.  Fortunately a picture says a thousand words and these pictures are doozies.

Lord von Schmitt

Lord von Schmitt

From boredpanda:

Crochet’s not just for scarves and sweaters anymore. Schuyler Ellers, who runs the Lord von Schmitt Etsy shop, creates dazzlingly colorful patterned crochet shorts out of recycled materials that are sure to please both the wearer and their stunned beholders (man or woman).

Ellers embraces every style out there, from form-fitting booty shorts to extravagant bell-bottom pants. Most of these fabulous pieces are made of recycled vintage crochet afghans; according to Ellers’ shop, “Afghan blankets are original pieces of folk art, hand made by artisans across America since the 1960’s and well before. With scissors and a sewing machine I transform vintage crochets into wearable sculpture!”

Read the entire post and see additional looks at: http://www.boredpanda.com/crochet-shorts-schuyler-ellers-lord-von-schmitt/

Lord von Schmitt

Lord von Schmitt

Lord von Schmitt

Lord von Schmitt

The Chinese Vs. Japanese luxury market. One region, different desires.

Japanese flagChina flag

To the average American it may not seem like there is a vast difference between the desire and demand for luxury goods between Japanese and Chinese consumers.  The reality is that couldn’t be far farther from the truth.  Sure both countries border the same body of water and both are in Asia but other then that they are two very different markets.

In his article from Business Insider, Erwan Rambourg sums it up this way, the Japanese customer buys luxury goods to fit in, while the Chinese consumer purchases luxury items to stand out.

In his 2003 book, “Living It Up: America’s Love Affair with Luxury” (Simon & Schuster), James Twitchell made the case that the urge of fitting in is depressingly vulgar but essential. The message from many luxury brands is that products will enable consumers to ‘re-invent’ themselves and that they ‘deserve’ to reward themselves.

Two recurring questions I hear are: ‘How is Chinese luxury demand different to Japanese demand?’ and ‘As there is limited growth with the Japanese, what is the risk that growth moderates quickly now with the Chinese?’

First, China is the only male-driven luxury goods market. Japanese consumption in the space has been essentially female driven.

But beyond that, there are many more consumer profiles in China and many differences in culture, history and sociology which make me believe that growth can continue strongly with the Chinese for some time still.

I have a friend, Francis Belin, who runs Swarovski for Asia Pacific and used to run Jaeger-LeCoultre (a watch brand, part of the Richemont group) for Japan. His view is that Japanese people used to purchase luxury products to fit in whereas Chinese are buying the goods to stand out. There are actually similarities there: consumption serves a purpose of being perceived as part (or not part) of a group. In Japan, you became part of society; in China, you leave the have-nots and show face when buying luxury. As Tom Doctoroff puts it in “What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism and the Modern Chinese Consumer” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), individuals in China ‘stand out in order to fit in’, meaning individual expression usually does not imply a break from the norm but a slight step up without straying away too much from conformity. This also may explain why it is rare to come across extremely innovative brands of Chinese origin.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/chinese-vs-japanese-luxury-booms-2015-1#ixzz3PbyvL3M3

 

Can Nike and Adidas be both performance and fashion based?

 

(L) Karlie Kloss modelling Pedro Lourenço for Nike, (R) Mary Katrantzou x Adidas | Source: Nike, Adidas

(L) Karlie Kloss modelling Pedro Lourenço for Nike, (R) Mary Katrantzou x Adidas | Source: Nike, Adidas

More and more Nike and Adidas seem to be focusing on the fashion elements of their businesses.  While many of their products clearly are designed with a blend of performance and style, it becomes more and more obvious that quite a few of their products are designed with the thought that they will never see a drop of sweat.  The collaborations with stars from the athletic, music and fashion industries leave little doubt that form rules over function.

Does this reduce the consumers desire to brand themselves with the swoosh or three stripes because of a reducing level of performance credibility or drive consumption as we seek the coolest, newest look.  Clearly the every increasing billions that these global giants are raking in suggests the latter.

Robin Mellery-Pratt at Business of Fashion takes a closer look…

On Monday, Nike launched a new capsule collection, dubbed NikeLab x JFS, with Berlin-based Acronym designer Johanna F. Schneider. On Thursday evening, at Paris men’s fashion week, Adidas is set to unveil a new collaboration with Junichi Abe’s Kolor. Together, the launches are the latest in a crescendo of fashion-related activities by the world’s top sportswear brands, whose core identities have long been more squarely rooted in athletic performance.

Traditionally aligned with athletes, Nike recently began working with fashion model Karlie Kloss on a major women’s marketing campaign. Though Kloss is a former ballet dancer who practices yoga, the company has never before partnered with a fashion model on this kind of scale. What’s more, in October, Nike staged a high-profile fashion show in New York as part of its “Women’s Innovation Summit” — attended by scores of fashion editors and featuring Kloss and a small army of models — to unveil its collaboration with Brazilian designer Pedro Lourenço.

Read the rest at: http://www.businessoffashion.com/2015/01/nike-adidas-sportswear-fashion.html

More Bad Fashion from London

Agi & Sam

Agi & Sam

The horror never stops.  Part two of the best and worst looks from London thanks to four-pins.com

For the full slide show http://four-pins.com/style/best-and-most-ridiculous-looks-at-london-collections-men-fallwinter-2015-1/

Craig Green

Craig Green

Katie Eery

Katie Eery

Richard James

Richard James

Nasir Mazhar

Nasir Mazhar

maharishi

maharishi

 

Can Abercrombie & Fitch come back from the dead?

abercrombie-spring 2015

abercrombie-spring 2015

For years they made their stores as uncomfortable for adults as possible.  Excluded anyone who wasn’t tall, thin and desirable.  They weren’t ashamed about it and made millions of dollars.  Then things went bad.  Really bad.  Can Abercrombie & Fitch re-invent themselves and return to profitability?  If they do one thing is for sure, they won’t care about short guys.

Erika Adams at Racked.com takes a closer look at the challenges A&F faces:

“Effortless, all-American style.” Abercrombie & Fitch works hard to embed that slogan into everything it produces these days, which now includes categories like neoprene crop tops and lace-trimmed midi dresses—quite a different look from denim cut-off shorts, a flannel and flip-flops. But it wasn’t always that effortless: Just a year ago, Abercrombie aimed for the “essence of privilege and casual luxury,” a slogan that was more in line with the cooler-than-you brand high-schoolers in the early aughts pictured Abercombie to be.

Years ago, Abercrombie’s biggest media concern was paying off the Situation so that he would stop wearing its heavily logo-ed graphic tees. Now, in an effort to reposition itself as a more inclusive brand, every move is strategic. The product team hasscaled back logos; there are press previews for new product lines; and the store’s notoriously semi-nude male models put on shirts. Abercrombie no longer sees the color black as taboo, and stores have started stocking clothing above a size 10. The most striking change, however, was an announcement made last month that CEO Michael Jeffries was leaving the company. Bit by bit it might not mean much—plus-size options have only been around for a year, and those male models have only been clothed since the summer—but combined and coupled with the retirement of Jeffries, the changes signify a new phase of the brand, one where Abercrombie exerts a ton of effort in an attempt to find its footing in a heavily competitive and highly digital retail environment.

Read the rest at: http://racked.com/archives/2015/01/13/tracking-abercrombies-plan-to-get-cool-again.php

The worst looks from London Fashion week

Sibling at London Fashion Week

Sibling at London Fashion Week

Get ready to laugh.   Fashion week in London hit and thanks to the team over at four-pins.com we’ve got a slideshow of epic proportions.  They include a few of their favorite looks as well, which I don’t necessarily agree with, but they’ve got worst part down.  Take a look and enjoy.

See the entire show at http://four-pins.com/style/best-looks-london-collections-men-fall-winter-2015/

 

Topman at London Fashion Week

Topman at London Fashion Week

Astrid Andersen London Fashion Week

Astrid Andersen London Fashion Week

KTZ at London Fashion Week

KTZ at London Fashion Week

KTZ  at London Fashion Week  January 2015

KTZ at London Fashion Week January 2015

 

 

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